Online Program

Overcoming Challenges to CAUTI Prevention
By Linda Greene, RN, MS, CIC, Shannon Oriola, RN, CIC, COHN, James Marx, RN, MS, CIC
Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of healthcare-associated infection, accounting for more than 30% of infections reported by acute care hospitals. The majority of healthcare-associated UTIs are caused by instrumentation of the urinary tract. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) has been associated with increased morbidity, mortality, hospital cost, and length of stay. The presence of bacteria in the urine commonly leads to unnecessary antibiotic use, and urinary drainage systems are often one of the greatest reservoirs for multidrug-resistant bacteria and can be a source of transmission of these resistant pathogens to other patients.

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Webinars

Using OASIS to Improve Outcomes in Home Care Patients

Speaker
Lisa A. Gorski, MS, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN

The instrument/data collection tool used to collect and report performance data by home health agencies is called the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS). Since 1999, CMS has required Medicare-certified home health agencies to collect and transmit OASIS data for all adult patients whose care is reimbursed by Medicare and Medicaid. Beginning in January 2010, home health agencies have been required to collect a revised version of the OASIS data set (OASIS-C). OASIS-C includes data items supporting measurement of rates for use of specific evidence-based care processes. In her webinar, Ms. Gorski an expert in OASIS-C, explains how home health care nurses can use this tool to improve the outcomes of two common home health care conditions: post stroke and diabetes.

Learning Objectives:
After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe which assessments are critical to complete in the initial homecare visit for stroke and diabetes patients
  2. Explain the importance of skin assessments in diabetes patients
  3. Describe how to help patients and their families on the details of optimal oral and enteral nutrition
  4. Explain why pain and depression assessments are often minimized but important parts of a comprehensive OASIS

Tying it All Together:
Preventing Infections and Complications with Urinary Catheters

Speakers:
Ann Marie Pettis, RN, BSN, CIC
Denise Nix, RN, MS, CWOCN

Between 15% and 25% of hospitalized patients may receive short-term indwelling urinary catheters. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of healthcare-associated infection, accounting for more than 30% of infections reported by acute care hospitals. CAUTI has been associated with increased morbidity, mortality, hospital cost, and length of stay. In addition to CAUTIs, patients with indwelling catheters can suffer other complications. Keeping the catheter secure is beneficial to the patient and caregiver in multiple ways including: reduced pain, risk of infection, skin damage and caregiver time, as well as prevention of catheter replacement. In this free CE webinar, two experts provide their perspectives on the prevention of infections and complications and help tie together the best practices to manage the urinary catheter for the bedside nurse.

After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. List at least 3 approved indications for inserting an indwelling urinary catheter
  2. Describe the components of urinary catheter insertion and maintenance bundles in the prevention of CAUTIs
  3. Discuss factors to consider for appropriate securement of the urinary catheter

Protecting Our Pediatric Patients Webinar
Enteral Feeding Misconnections: Minimizing the Risks for Pediatric Patients


Speaker
Elizabeth Pash MS, LD, RD, Metabolic Health Manager, Covidien
An enteral misconnection is defined as an inadvertent connection between an enteral feeding system and a non-enteral system. Serious patient harm, including death, can occur if fluids, medications, or nutritional formulas intended for administration into the GI tract are administered via the wrong route. In her presentation, Ms. Pash will outline causative factors and relate the latest strategies for minimizing risk to pediatric patients. This session is accredited for 1.0 contact hours.

By the end of this activity, the learner will be able to:

  1. Describe the contributing factors for enteral misconnections.
  2. Outline educational concepts to minimize misconnections risk.
  3. List the equipment purchasing strategies for safe enteral devices.

Making Water Work in the Tube-Fed Patient (CPEs for Dietitians, CEs for Nurses)

Presenter
Elizabeth Pash, MS, RD, LD, Metabolic Health Manager, Covidien, Nursing Care
This webinar focuses on dehydration in enterally-fed patients. Enteral nutrition alone may not provide enough fluid or free water to meet the hydration needs of a tube fed patient. Additional water intake is usually necessary to replace normal urine and insensible fluid losses in addition to further loss through ostomies, fistulas, drainage bags, diarrhea, emesis, excessive oral secretions, and diaphoresis. Dehydration is a serious risk for a tube-fed patient who is not allowed oral intake, has an altered mental status, is unable to communicate, is elderly or fluid-restricted, or has thirst impairment. Identification of risk factors, along with evaluation of subjective, objective, and laboratory parameters, provides the basis for clinical evaluation

At the conclusion of this webinar participants will be able to:

1. Identify methods to assess dehydration
2. Discuss strategies to minimize the risk for dehydration in a patient receiving enteral nutrition
3. Determine methods to calculate fluids needs

Overcoming Challenges to CAUTI Prevention

Speaker
By Ann Marie Petits, RN, BSN, CIC

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of healthcare-associated infection, accounting for more than 30% of infections reported by acute care hospitals. The majority of healthcare-associated UTIs are caused by instrumentation of the urinary tract. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) has been associated with increased morbidity, mortality, hospital cost, and length of stay. The presence of bacteria in the urine commonly leads to unnecessary antibiotic use, and urinary drainage systems are often one of the greatest reservoirs for multidrug-resistant bacteria and can be a source of transmission of these resistant pathogens to other patients.

Now you can get your free CE immediately by taking your test online. After reading the article, log into www.saxetesting.com, register and take your test. Upon successful completion, your certificate can be printed immediately

Each issue of Safe Practices in Patient Care contains a Free Continuing Education activity (CE). The costs for the CE have been funded through an educational grant provided by Covidien